12D: Advanced Paragraphs RLA4

12D: Advanced Paragraphs RLA4
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Lesson 12D: Advanced Paragraphs RLA4 Quiz
Question #1: Truth or Dare?

We all know that honesty is important, but have you ever found yourself telling a white lie? A white lie is a harmless lie that is told to avoid hurting someone’s feelings. Sometimes people tell white lies to get along with others. Studies have shown that most white lies are told in order to benefit the other person. Scientists say that people have a natural desire to be liked, so telling a person a harmless lie can avoid harsh feelings.

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Question #2: Truth or Dare?

People tell white lies for various reasons. When a person works hard and cooks a nice dinner for a loved one, it is much easier to compliment the cook’s efforts as opposed to telling the cook the truth—that the meat was overcooked. However, if the cook does not ask about the meal, it is easier to avoid mentioning the meat. On the other hand, when a person spends a lot of time on making a nice meal, it is better to be honest and compliment some food that tastes good. Taking your own initiative and complimenting beforehand may help to avoid the cook asking other questions, especially about the well-done meat!

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Question #3: Truth or Dare?

Trying to keep an innocent secret may sometimes require a white lie. For instance, if a child planned a surprise party for a parent and had to run out and buy cups for the party, telling the truth would ruin the surprise. In this case, a white lie will be revealed after the party without any hard feelings.

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Question #4: Truth or Dare?

People are often confronted with white lying in some social situations. One person may want to get together with another, but the mutual feeling of friendship is not there. Telling the other person the truth about not wanting to get together may be mean. In this situation, people sometimes find a way to be kind, and normally make a lame excuse to spare the other hard feelings. Telling the truth may have led to a feeling of the other’s lack of self-worth.

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Question #5: Truth or Dare?

Although generally, people want to tell the truth, when a person tells any lie, harmless as it may seem, telling any lie can do harm to the body. Studies show that lies have been known to cause extreme stress to the body, which increases the heart rate and anxiety. Also, it takes work to decide to tell a lie and make a story believable. After telling the lie, a person has to remember the lie so that they don’t get caught.

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Question #6: Truth or Dare?

For most of us, our natural instinct is to tell the truth. Most people have been taught early on that honesty is the best policy. The next time that you find that another’s feelings are at stake, the best way to handle the situation is to figure out a way to kindly tell the truth. Telling the truth will always be the best way to maintain relationships and trust.

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Question #7: How to Say No Without Feeling Guilty

When people ask you for something and you say no, your first feeling may be that they are the going to dislike you. So, you are tempted to say “yes,” even though you do not want to. Saying “yes” when you want to say “no” ends up many times with frustration, resentfulness, and anger. Research shows that giving into another person not only creates a cycle of awful feelings, but it causes damage to relationships. Conflict avoidance—saying something to please another, is not healthy for successful relationships. Although having negative emotions between people are inevitable, learning how to deal with saying “no” and feeling good about it will help in establishing healthy relationships.

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Question #8: How to Say No Without Feeling Guilty

Although saying “no” can cause another person anger, many people who hear the word “no” will not suffer with ill feelings. People feel that the word “no” angers others because they have trained their attention on when they previously said “no” and suffered from it. Maybe somebody blew up, stormed away and never spoke to you again. But noticing that many “no” responses will not cause emotional difficulties is important for developing a realistic perspective and future healthy relationships. People who say “no,” but include being polite and empathetic have a slim chance of another retaliating or becoming furious. Watching how others handle similar situations effectively will help you when it is your turn to say “no.”

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Question #9: How to Say No Without Feeling Guilty

Saying “no” also helps to develop good boundaries. Knowing what you are comfortable and not comfortable with ahead of time makes it easier to not cave in and say “yes.” This helps with learning to eliminate unwanted obligations and identifying priorities and focus. For instance, you will feel more justified when saying “no” in order to pursue certain goals, such as prioritizing family or school over saying “yes” to someone.

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Question #10: How to Say No Without Feeling Guilty

Many times, people pressure others for immediate answers, while always looking for that “yes.” Experts say that delaying answers allows you to calm down and properly evaluate whether you really want to agree or not. Thinking through options carefully also provides a sense of increased control. Saying, “I have to think about this and I will get back to you,” gives others the understanding that you are carefully considering their request, which may alleviate the possible consequence of bad feelings, especially if rejection is around the corner.

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Question #11: How to Say No Without Feeling Guilty

Also, when people live by clear principles or rules, it is easier to say “no” and people are more likely to respect your response. There is less chance of someone feeling personally rejected if you are clear that you have a “rule” that you need to live by consistently. For instance, if a friend asks to borrow money, a phrase like, “Sorry, I have a policy about not lending money,” sounds less personal. Having a policy implies that you have learned from a previous experience that what the person is requesting is unwise.

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Question #12: How to Say No Without Feeling Guilty

There will always be a nagging person who will never take “no” for an answer. Experts say that this type of person needs a “broken record” response. This means that the response must remain firm and repetitive. When a person persists by asking again and again, the same response must be repeated. An example is, “Sorry, I can’t.” This helps with persistence and does not allow people to bargain because you just keep repeating your denial and not responding to new angles of reasoning to say “yes.” Responding with a, Sorry, I can’t,” must include not getting angry or raising your voice. The same “no” response needs to continue calmly with repetition, until the other person is completely exhausted.

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Question #13: How to Say No Without Feeling Guilty

So, to say “no” without feeling guilty, understand that the word no is a healthy response. And next time that someone bugs you because they are not getting what they want, saying “no” politely and doing what you choose to do is part of healthy relationships!

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Question #14: No More Tangles

We know that an octopus has super long arms, but have you ever wondered how octopuses keep their arms from tangling up? Unlike human arms and legs that are restricted to certain movements, the eight appendages on an octopus have an infinite number of degrees of freedom. So, one would think that those long appendages would get tangled up once in a while.

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Question #15: No More Tangles

The reason that those long appendages do not tie themselves up in knots is because when an octopus gets stuck with a tangle or has an accident, its arms sever from the body but then they grow back. Interestingly, the severed ones remain very active for an hour or more after separation.

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Question #16: No More Tangles

Considered the most intelligent invertebrates, the octopus is not smart with its extensive arms and is unable to avoid tangling. This is because its brain does not control the arm movements. A set of neurons at each base of the arm controls each appendage. But without a brain, the neurons are not able to help the octopus know where their arms are or what they are doing.

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Question #17: No More Tangles

Also, another part of the body helps its arms. The skin of the octopus prevents its arms from attaching to each other, or to themselves. A specific chemical signal in the skin prohibits the skin from reattaching to another sucker. Each sucker has numerous embedded sensors, making it sort of act like a tongue. The sensors allow for the octopus to not just touch things, but also to taste them. Scientists believe that there may be a chemical signal that tastes so bad, that the octopus does not want to attach to another arm.

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