11B: Advanced Multiple Paragraphs 2

11B: Advanced Multiple Paragraphs 2
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Lesson 11B: Advanced Multiple Paragraphs 2 Quiz
Question #1: PHONY BUSINESS

Carl loves his cell phone and he is on it all the time. His close friends say that he is addicted to talking on the phone. "He always has that thing near him." Carl's friend, Salah says. "If he's not talking, he's playing games, text messaging, or messing with his ring tones. It's extremely annoying."

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Question #2: Phony Business

Salah says that he was in line at the movie theater with Carl last week, and he could not believe what his friend did. "He was talking on his phone to someone who was standing right in front of him in line. It was unbelievable!" Salah says.

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Question #3: Phony Business

Carl’s friends think something must be done about his addictive habit. They think that he is a great guy, but when they all go out, Carl just messes with his phone and does not pay attention to anyone else. "We've thought about swiping his phone," Salah says, "but we know he'll just get another one with additional features for playing. We feel that his phone has replaced us!"

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Question #4: Phony Business

This weekend Salah invited Carl over to play video games. When Carl gets there, he is going to find all of his friends in Salah's living room. They are going to confront Carl and will discuss how they feel about his annoying addiction. "Hopefully he'll listen to us," Salah says. "We feel like our friendship is competing with his phone’s Angry Birds game. We are hoping that we can help him realize that “physical people” relationships that can hang out with him are much more valuable than a text message with an emoji."

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Question #5: The King

The lion is an ominous animal. The male weighs between 350 to 500 pounds. Most males are about nine feet long and about three and-a-half feet tall at the shoulders. Females are smaller, weigh 250 to 300 pounds, and are about eight feet long.

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Question #6: The King

Lions are extremely powerful and their strength is in the shoulders and forelegs. The lion's weight drags down the prey. Then the long, sharp claws hook into the prey so that the four long canine teeth can fasten onto the throat. Since the lion has no chewing teeth, it uses its canine teeth to rip the flesh into chunks and they swallow these pieces whole. These savage animals are mostly females, doing 85-90 percent of the pride’s hunting. While the females hunt, the males stay back to patrol their territory, protecting their pride.

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Question #7: The King

Lions are the laziest of the big cats and they live in groups called prides. Most will have one to three adult males, several females, and some cubs. Life within a pride is peaceful, where lions usually spend about 20 hours a day sleeping or resting. After a big meal, they may rest for 24 hours.

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Question #8: The King

Lions prefer to hunt large prey, such as zebra, antelope, giraffes, buffalo, and even elephants. They prefer to take on larger animals so that they can have several meals. They also hunt together to increase their success. Because their preferred prey can run faster than the lion, these lions catch their prey by surprise. They normally fan out along a broad front or semicircle to creep up on their prey. When they get as close as possible, they jump on the startled animal, knock it down, and kill it with a bite to the throat. Lions often hunt at night because their eyes can see in the dark, which makes them able to creep up closer to stalk their prey. Once the lion kills the prey, it is dragged to a shady spot and then the pride dines on the animal together. A male can eat about 75 pounds of meat in one meal; for their size, lions have huge appetites!

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Question #9: The Dome

Weather has always negatively impacted sports games. Rain, sleet, snow, and cold have affected both fans and players. Baseball fans often sat in the rain without cover. Football lovers sat through many freezing Sunday games. For both sports fans and players, the domed stadium saved the day! A huge plastic bubble kept out rain and snow. There was heat to keep things comfortable year-round.

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Question #10: The Dome

Domed stadiums have clearly changed the course of sports by making all comfortable. Still, the first Dome, the Houston Astrodome, initially had a problem.

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Question #11: The Dome

For the fans, the first dome was great but there was a major issue for the players. Baseball outfielders had the most difficult time because they had to learn to catch in a field with a translucent paned roof. This was almost as difficult as playing in the dark because the light panes of the roof blended with the white baseball. Fly balls seemed to drop out of nowhere and even skilled fielders were making errors. But the sunlight was needed to keep the grass on the field alive.

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Question #12: The Dome

Finally, the management decided to paint the panes of the roof dark. The problem was solved except that the grass needed light. So, the real grass was dug up and replaced with artificial turf, called Astroturf.

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Question #13: KNOCK! KNOCK!

Did you know that woodpeckers do not just knock on wood for food? Pecking furiously on trees is a way to communicate with other birds. But when these birds jab tree trunks, they peck so hard and fast that their heads look like a blur to the human eye.

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Question #14: KNOCK! KNOCK!

Woodpeckers that knock on dead wood for food are looking for insects to eat. Their chisel-like beaks chip away bark and decayed wood, and the violent tapping disturbs insects hidden deep inside the tree's cavities. When the woodpeckers reach the insects' home, they spear their dinner with their sticky tongue-tips and enjoy their protein meal.

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Question #15: KNOCK! KNOCK!

The woodpecker pecks at a speed of 1,300 miles per hour. At this speed, the impact of the bird's beak hitting the wood is almost like that of a supersonic jet smashing into a mountain. Each peck takes just a thousandth of a second. The movement is quicker than the human eye can follow. Incredibly, all this furious smashing does not injure the bird's cherry-sized brain.

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Question #16: KNOCK! KNOCK!

There is a secret to the woodpecker's ability to withstand this great impact from its pecking. The woodpecker's neck muscles are extremely well-coordinated so that the head and beak move in a perfectly straight line. This spreads the shock evenly throughout the bird's body and into the tree trunk. Pecking at even a slight angle would kill the woodpecker. With their strong neck and claws that firmly grasp tree limbs and trunks, the woodpecker is kept safe. Ironically, since woodpeckers also like to peck away at the exterior of old wooden homes, their destruction does not make these dwellings safe!

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